Perceptual systems of the self-management of students living with diabetes mellitus: an IQA approach

Keywords: diabetes mellitus, interactive qualitative analysis, self-management of diabetes, university

Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose levels over a long period of time. One in 10 people are living with DM.

Objective: The main purpose of this investigative study was to gain knowledge regarding the perceptions of students’ self-management living with diabetes mellitus at a tertiary institute.

Methods: The Interactive Qualitative Analysis (IQA) was used to construct and describe a cognitive mind map of students’ perceptions of their self-management living with DM.

Results: An analysis of the participants’ mind map representing students living with DM revealed eight main components (affinities), namely: Social awareness and acceptance, Food available on campus, Keeping insulin cool, Independent lifestyle, Adjusting by cooking, Hurdles in the academic environment, Causes of changing blood sugar and Adapting to effects of changing blood sugar.

Conclusion: The final perceptual system was an informative representation of the self-management of students living with DM. The system reflects barriers to compliance with self-management facing students living with DM. The system produced four recognisable loops or cycles, namely the Ignorance loop, the Revision loop, the Developing loop and the Self-management loop. These loops created pathways through the system for the students living with DM to find a way to better selfmanagement.

The full article is available at https://doi.org/10.1080/16089677.2020.1817281

Author Biographies

J K D Jacobs, North-West University

Medicine Usage in South Africa, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

W D Basson, North-West University

Medicine Usage in South Africa, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

M J Basson, North-West University

Medicine Usage in South Africa, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Published
2020-12-01
Section
Original Research