Nutritional status, glycaemic control and barriers to treatment compliance among patients with type 2 diabetes attending public primary health clinics in Maseru, Lesotho

  • Louise Van den Berg University of the Free State
  • Mohlakotsana Mokhehle University of the Free State
  • Jacques Raubenheimer University of the Free State
Keywords: barriers to treatment compliance, glycaemic control, Lesotho, nutritional status, type 2 diabetes mellitus

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the nutritional status, glycaemic control and barriers to treatment compliance of outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) attending two public primary health clinics in Maseru, Lesotho.

Design: Cross-sectional analytical study.

Setting: Lesotho Defence Force Clinic and Domiciliary Clinic.

Subjects: 124 participants with T2DM, 30–69 years.

Outcome measures: Sociodemography, medical history, diet, lifestyle, metabolic risk-related anthropometry, glycaemic and metabolic control, and barriers that may impact on treatment compliance.

Results: Participants (53.9; SD 9.4 years; 79.5% females; 53.3% diagnosed for > 5 years) were knowledgeable about basic lifestyle recommendations for diabetes, and reported being active (98.3%). However, 88.5% were overweight or obese; 93.4%, 78.1%; 66.1% did not meet the recommended intakes of dairy, vegetables and fruit; 10.7% used tobacco; and 52% of men drank excessively. None performed blood glucose self-monitoring, and 90.2% were ignorant of normal blood glucose ranges, while 94.3% had uncontrolled hypertension despite being on anti-hypertensive medication. Participants were rarely screened for long-term glycaemic control or comorbidities, or referred to dietitians, but 98.4% were satisfied with the services.

Conclusions: In this setting, patients were not meeting treatment goals for T2DM, and were not being screened or referred, rendering clinic visits a revolving door that poses the risk of costly complications.

The full article is available at https://doi.org/10.1080/16089677.2019.1649341

Author Biographies

Louise Van den Berg, University of the Free State

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Mohlakotsana Mokhehle, University of the Free State

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Jacques Raubenheimer, University of the Free State

Department of Biostatistics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Published
2019-11-26
Section
Original Research