Serum AGEs in black South African patients with type 2 diabetes

  • Cathrine Martha Mhlanga Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
  • Motetelo Alfred Mogale Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
  • Augustine Adu Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital
  • Leshweni Jeremiah Shai Tshwane University of Technology
Keywords: Serum AGEs, Type 2 diabetes, Black South Africans

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine serum advanced glycation end products (AGEs) levels in black South African patients with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D) and to compare the results with those reported for other ethnic/race groups. Design: Analytical cross-sectional study. Setting and subjects: The study subjects consisted of 138 black South African patients with T2D and 81 non-diabetic patients at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa. Outcome measures: Serum total AGEs (TAGEs), Nɛ-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), Nɛ-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL) and fluorescent AGEs (FAGEs). Results: Serum TAGEs, CML and CEL levels but not FAGEs were significantly higher in T2D patients than in non-diabetic patients. Serum TAGEs were lower than those reported for other ethnic/race groups whereas CML and FAGEs were within ranges reported for other ethnic/race groups. Only serum CEL levels were significantly higher in male than in female T2D patients and only serum FAGEs levels were negatively associated with age of the study subjects. Conclusions: With the exception of FAGEs, serum AGEs levels are significantly higher in T2D than in non-diabetic black South Africans patients. Also, serum TAGE levels black South African appear to be lower than those reported for other ethnic/race groups. (Full text available online at www.medpharm.tandfonline.com/oemd) Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa 2016; DOI: 10.1080/16089677.2016.1240934

Author Biographies

Cathrine Martha Mhlanga, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
Department of Biochemistry School of Pathology & Pre-Clinical Sciences Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
Motetelo Alfred Mogale, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
Department of Biochemistry School of Pathology & Pre-Clinical Sciences Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
Augustine Adu, Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital
Internal Medicine and Consultant
Leshweni Jeremiah Shai, Tshwane University of Technology
Department of Biomedical Sciences Faculty of Science Tshwane University of Technology
Published
2016-11-29
Section
Research Articles